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Recentposts

Peace of Mind

By James J. Kelly, MS, DO, FAOAO I would like to think that every surgeon, sitting down to begin a case, has the expectation of the best outcome possible.  We educate our patients about their various conditions and what we can do to address their problems, making clear that we can never offer a guarantee. […]

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A New Strategy

By Mitchell Pet, MD When I participate in achieving a bad surgical outcome, it seems like the sensible thing to do is acknowledge it, learn from it, salvage it as best I can, and then move on to help someone else.  I like to think that I am reasonably good at acknowledging and learning from […]

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Some Lessons Are Given the Hard Way

By Michael J. Schreck, MD, FAAOS Bad outcomes and complications happen to us all as surgeons. If you don’t have complications, either you don’t operate or you have your head buried in the sand. I am still fairly early in my career, however I have certainly had my share of poor outcomes. My range of […]

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Careful Preparation

By Joseph M. Sherrill, MD I appreciate the opportunity to discuss or share with the ASSH Perspective Audience how I emotionally handle bad treatment outcomes, and how these experiences have shaped me as a surgeon. I am 70 years old and have worked in a busy private practice model since 1980, and more recently in […]

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Perspectives of Retirement

By Richard S. Smith, MD I would like to add my perspectives on my recent retirement to this edition of ASSH Perspectives.  In February, 2021, I retired after over 30 years of practice.  This was a planned event centered around my youngest daughter’s graduation from medical school in June, 2020, and the expiration of my […]

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Complications Are Inevitable

By Caitlin Symonette, MSc, MD, FRCSC With high operative caseloads, bad outcomes/complications are inevitable. This is a humbling reality of being a surgeon. I find this especially true at my early stage of career. Also like most surgeons, I am a type A personality. I like to be in control and strive for perfection. I […]

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Hire a Scribe

By Dori Cage, MD Interrupt less After making a conscious effort to interrupt less and listen to the patient’s story, I was pleasantly surprised how often the patient would succinctly provide relevant information and often answer questions that I had not thought to ask. It is during the period when patients seem to ramble that […]

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Becoming Your Patient

By James H. Calandruccio, MD ‘Becoming your patient’ is my single best tip for good patient communication.   As health care providers we must use communication methods suitable for each individual patient which can be, I believe, essentially becoming your patient.   Regardless of the problem(s) that your patient may have, becoming that patient should allow you […]

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Kindness

By Sandra Collins, MD I had the great fortune to spend a year with Dr. James R. Urbaniak at the end of my training.  He was an outstanding mentor and an even better human being.  After a particularly trying day of clinic, I asked him, “Boss, how are you so patient and nice to everyone?”  […]

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Drawing Pictures

By William K. Feinstein, MD The importance of good communication with patients cannot be overestimated.  I find it to be extremely important in the treatment process, not only for patient compliance, but also for the patient’s overall treatment experience.  If the patient feels like he/she is able to communicate well back and forth with the treating […]

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